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In The News

2017 Data Breaches- The Worst So Far
August 23, 2017 - Heidi Daitch, IdentityForce

In 2016, reported data breaches increased by 40%. Yahoo also announced the largest data breach in history last year, affecting more than one billion accounts. What will 2017 hold? We’re hoping for the best, but you may just see 2017 data breaches get even more messy and serious.

Note: This post will be continuously updated with new information as additional 2017 data breaches are reported.

E-Sports Entertainment Association (ESEA)

January 8, 2017: On December 30, 2016, ESEA, one of the largest video gaming communities, issued a warning to players after discovering a breach. At the time, it wasn’t known what was stolen and how many people were affected. However, in January, LeakedSource revealed that 1,503,707 ESEA records had been added to its database and that leaked records included a great deal of private information: registration date, city, state, last login, username, first and last name, bcrypt hash, email address, date of birth, zip code, phone number, website URL, Steam ID, Xbox ID, and PSN ID.

Xbox 360 ISO and PSP ISO

February 1, 2017: Security expert Troy Hunt, of the website Have I Been Pwned?, revealed that Xbox 360 ISO and PSP ISO had been hacked in September 2015. The websites, both forums which host illegal video game download files, housed sensitive user information that was taken. 1.2 million Xbox 360 ISO users and 1.3 million PSP ISO users were affected and may have had their e-mail addresses, IP addresses, usernames, and passwords stolen in the breach. At this time, it’s not clear who is responsible, but forum users were encouraged to change their passwords immediately.

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

February 7, 2017: IHG, the company that owns popular hotel chains like Crowne Plaza, Holiday Inn, Candlewood Suites, and Kimpton Hotels, announced a data breach that affected 12 of its properties. Malware was found on servers which processed payments made at on-site restaurants and bars; travelers that used cards at the front desk did not have information taken. The malware was active from August 2016 to December 2016 and stolen data includes cardholder names, card numbers, expiration dates, and internal verification codes. Some targeted locations include Sevens Bar & Grill at Crowne Plaza San Jose-Silicon Valley, the Bristol Bar & Grille at the Holiday Inn in San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, InterContinental San Francisco, Aruba’s Holiday Inn Resort, and InterContinental Los Angeles Century City.

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